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Genre, Length and Blurbs:

I have described it on Amazon as a collection of thought-provoking and action-packed short science fiction stories:

  • In The Man Who Stole the World the consequences of allowing companies to own genetic modifications is explored to the extreme.
  • Day of the Beast looks at one possible result of not properly securing the new forms of energy we are creating.
  • The Smartest Assassin details one possible implication of nanotechnology.
  • In Hulo and the Stinkfruit you get to see a glimpse a particularly challenging day for an inhabitant of a barren and alien world.
  • Flaw of Gravity is a nod to Isaac Asimov’s early SF stories, in which two scientists strive to explain a very peculiar anomaly.
  • Finally, in the title story The Caverns of Eden, it’s two hundred years since the oil, water and food ran out, resulting in a global nuclear war. Fortunately for mankind the Norwegians had been prepared, having hollowed out deep underground caverns – the home of the world’s last city.

All of these are science fiction, with the initial five stories being between 500 and 2,500 words, while the title story, The Caverns of Eden, is on the cusp of a Novelette/Novella at about 16,500 words.

How did the story come about?
In five of these stories I wanted to address different aspects of the way technology is changing our lives now, and then extrapolate what they could lead to in the future, while Hulo and the Stinkfruit came about when I read about a fruit called the Durian which has an awful smell, yet people claim it tastes delicious.

Do you prefer writing short fiction over novels, and if so, why?
Mostly I write factual books on technology and motivation (see http://amazon.com/author/robinnixon), but in my spare time I am starting to write these short stories, and am considering turning The Caverns of Eden short story into a novel, as I want to take the characters and story a lot further.

Which short fiction writers have most influenced you.
My most influential writers are Isaac Asimov and Ray Bradbury, so you may detect hits of their style in these stories 😉

Available at Amazon.

 

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